Do Your Best

I was preparing for two very important presentations this week.  Each one could lead to a great business opportunity for our Free Enterprise Warriors team.  I was anxious about them.  In my life, as an aspiring person, I have often had a bad case of “preparation anxiety.”  I want so badly to do well that I stress out.  Often this causes “preparation paralysis” or worse yet “preparation procrastination.”  I don’t like the feelings of fear, so I just try to ignore them and distract myself doing something else.  It doesn’t work.  I end up not enjoying the avoidance activity, even if I normally would, because my subconscious knows and keep reminding me that I should be doing something to get ready.

I have often taught people to “let fear be your compass.”  Meaning: if you have a fear about doing something it means you care about the outcome; therefore, it is a sign that you should do it.  If you didn’t care you wouldn’t have the fear.  So, doing what you fear is the right thing. But, how do you not let that fear overwhelm you, cause you distress and interfere with your preparations.

People say, “don’t worry, just do your best – if you do your best, then that’s all you can ask of yourself.”  That sounds like good advice.  But, then I’m worried about doing my best.  What does that mean?  How would I know?  Can’t I always find some way in which I might have done better?  What if I don’t really do my best – what if someone else points out what I should have done better?  Isn’t “doing your best” just another form of mental pressure?

Yes, in my experience it is.  So, I have learned not to do it.  It took me a long time to come to a very simple self-awareness: I am always doing my best.  That’s just what I do.  Actually, that’s what we all do.  If we want to sincerely have things work out, we try to do whatever we can to have it work out.  We simply do our best.  That’s how we are motivated, that’s how we are built.

How well we do is determined, not by driving ourselves with critical or fear-based self talk, but, by preparation for the task.  Then, we just act, we just do.  We give it a try.  Sometimes it works out as we intended, sometimes it doesn’t – in which case we now have a great learning experience.

I’ve learned to not be attached to the outcome, but to enjoy the preparation.  I know I want to do well, but the only difference I can make in what I do, is how I prepare.  Steven Pressfield says “Do the Work” – in fact that’s the title of his latest book.  And, I loved it.  He says that if we are artists or entrepreneurs, the most important thing we have to do is the work – the preparation, the practice, the study, the rehearsal, the building of the skills.  Then we just create, we do, we act, we show up, we ship.

For me now, having pretty much left “anticipation anxiety” and “fear of failure” behind, I simply enjoy the game.  And, I get ready to play the game – I just prepare.  I remember that the definition of worry is “stewing without doing.” I have actually returned to my childhood Mad Magazine anti-hero Alfred E. Newman who always said: “What, me worry?”  Now, I just ignore the fear, detach from the outcome and do the work.

Are You Willing to Let Us In? A short study in Collaboration

Working with our “Virtual COO Services” clients has become for me an enlightening experience. We have clients in different industries, different financial situations and different motivations. Without a doubt, the most successful work we have done has been with those clients that are ready to collaborate with a team. When an entrepreneur is ready to open up, we can work together to create a process by which some of the most interesting and profitable ideas start. If the entrepreneur is not open to collaboration we have seen the energy just fizzle.

We try to keep to a weekly schedule of 45 minutes to 1 hour of team sharing. We do set an agenda for the meetings, but often we go off on tangents that produce some of the most creative action items. We then go ahead and implement those ideas and then meet back the following week to measure how that worked or didn’t work.

When everyone knows what the schedule is it also become a kind of accountability exercise. Everyone on the team knows what is expected of them for the next meeting. It has the strength of a boulder rolling down hill. It keeps building on itself until it has a momentum on its own.

When an entrepreneur is not ready to share or has not gotten to the frustrating and overwhelming tipping point when they know with all certainty they need a collaborative effort, we all just end up spinning our wheels. They may see minor results but not the intensity of sharing ideas that come from a committed team environment.

This for me has truly been a learning experience and continues to open my eyes to creative collaboration.

The SWAT (Smart Women With Available Time) Team

I found this Wall Street Journal article extremely interesting and would like to pass it on to other “stay at home” entrepreneurs and business owners who are looking for dedicated, experienced employees for their positions:

The Wall Street Journal:
Lots of employers would like to be able to hire cheap, temporary teams of seasoned pros with experience managing $2 billion investment portfolios, running ad campaigns or earning Ph.D.s in neuroscience.
But few know the secret to finding temps of that caliber: Look on playgrounds and at PTA meetings.

The decision among some highly educated women to stay home with children is sparking a countertrend: The rise of the mommy “SWAT team.” The acronym, for “smart women with available time,” is one mother’s label for all-mom teams assembled quickly through networking and staffing firms to handle crash projects. Employers get lots of voltage, cheap, while the women get a skills update and a taste of the professional challenges they miss.

Skilled workers taking temp projects isn’t new, of course. What’s different about these teams is that they’re available on short notice because the women are usually at home; they tend to work cheap because their main motive is to keep their skills fresh; and they’re often extraordinarily well-qualified, having left the work force voluntarily when their careers were on the ascent.

This article sums up the win-win of hiring SWAT members who can multi-task and add value to a business.  I know, I am one of them.

Contact me if  you have any comments – tina@freeenterprisewarriors.com